Intermittent Fasting and Weight Management

13 Jul

Intermittent Fasting and Weight Management

Fasting can be a tool for weight loss but is not necessarily any better than simply reducing caloric intake. A 2015 meta-analysis of 12 clinical trials focused on IF found weight-loss results comparable between fasting and caloric restriction groups. When researchers compared the fasting group with the continuous calorie restriction group, they concluded, “There was no significant difference in weight loss amounts or body composition changes” (Seimon et al., 2015).

Similarly, a 2018 meta-analysis of six studies found that “intermittent energy restriction was comparable to continuous energy restriction for short-term weight loss in overweight and obese adults,” again showing that fasting isn’t necessarily superior to caloric restriction in terms of weight loss (Harris et al., 2018).

So why do people seem to lose weight with IF?

When it comes to any diet or plan, the reason people lose weight is more about the caloric intake and awareness of food, portions, etc., rather than the specific dietary protocol they are following. This appears to be true for fasting as well. IF may work as a tool but isn’t superior for weight loss. Further, fasting is a high-level strategy for managing weight.  

Much like moving from body-weight exercises in the gym to performing higher-level body-building movements, there are certain nutritional foundations that should be mastered before manipulating caloric intake with fasting.

A 2019 study found that people who eat a diet with more highly processed food end up eating approximately 500 more calories per day. The study suggested, “Limiting consumption of ultra-processed foods may be an effective strategy for obesity prevention and treatment” (Hall et al, 2019). Clients wanting to improve weight or health could benefit by eating fewer highly processed foods in addition to more fruits and vegetables, before moving to higher-level strategies like fasting.

Intermittent Fasting and Managing Cholesterol and Glucose

Researchers have also been interested in the use of IF to help manage both cholesterol levels and glucose. The results, however, have been less than consistent.

One randomized controlled trial that followed 100 obese participants for 12 months found “no significant differences in blood pressure, heart rate, fasting glucose, and fasting insulin. At 12 months, although there were no differences in total cholesterol and triglycerides, the alternate-day fasting group showed significantly increased low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels.” The authors did not comment on a possible cause (Trepanowski et al., 2017).

While Trepanowski et al. (2017) noted an increase in LDL cholesterol among subjects who fasted, a 2018 study conducted by Ganesen and colleagues noted a decrease in LDL cholesterol levels in a meta-analysis of four studies on IF. More research is necessary to investigate the long-term impacts of fasting on metabolic markers.

Suttun et al. (2018) found that early time-restricted feeding (i.e., dinner is eaten by 3pm) improved both insulin sensitivity and blood pressure. Unfortunately, the study was only conducted on men. Further, the early feeding window could be particularly challenging to implement and maintain over the long-term.

While the research results on IF are mixed, previous studies have shown that the strategies that have the biggest impact on managing cholesterol and glucose/A1c are increasing fiber intake with fruits, vegetables and whole grains in addition to increasing exercise (Mcrae, 2017).

Practical Concerns of Following an Intermittent Fasting Diet

Supporters of IF assert that fasting is simple because tracking calories or eating specific food isn’t necessary—simply eat only during your specific days or eating windows and you’ll lose weight. However, as research suggests that implementation isn’t quite so simple.

In the 12-month randomized control trial mentioned above, the dropout rate was higher in the alternate-day fasting group, which suggests that fasting may be more challenging to stick to. The prospect of going without food for a whole day or sticking to a very low-calorie intake a few days a week may not be feasible in the long-term (Trepanowski et al., 2017).

Putting fasting into practice in daily life becomes more complicated due to social events, cravings or high stress levels. One recent study tracked individuals who intended to fast to determine whether or not they followed through. The study found “emotional, stress eating, and food craving are disinhibiting traits that seem to increase intention-behaviour gaps” (Reichenberger et al, 2019). In other words, despite the best of intentions, common aspects of daily life often get in the way of being able to maintain an IF diet.

Is Intermittent Fasting Appropriate for Everyone?

While there is no specific research on IF and female hormones, there are some studies that suggest fasting could adversely impact ovulation and fertility in women. For example, Fujiwara and Nakata (2010) found that skipping breakfast was related to menstruation disorders in college women. In subsequent research, Fujiwara and colleagues (2018) found evidence that fasting negatively impacted ovulation in female rats. While animal data cannot directly be applied to humans, it does suggest that further research is necessary, especially considering the impact fasting can have on hormonal health.

There are a few groups of people who should NOT fast. These include:

  • Pregnant or breastfeeding women
  • Anyone with an unhealthy relationship with food, or a history of eating disorders or disordered eating habits
  • Anyone with diabetes, or who experiences low blood sugar

Additionally, women with a history of irregular periods or who are trying to conceive are urged to proceed with caution, as IF may adversely impact hormone levels.

Conclusion: More Research is Needed

A lack of high-quality, large-scale controlled studies and longitudinal data, as well as multiple definitions and methods for fasting, make it challenging to extrapolate recommendations from the current research. Without long-term research studies, including studies that specifically investigate the impact of IF on men and women, it’s too early to know the long-term benefits or drawbacks of fasting.

In their comprehensive research review of animal and human studies on fasting, Harvie and Howell (2017) sum up what we can safely conclude about IR: “We do not know conclusively whether long-term IER [intermittent energy restriction] is a safe and effective method of weight control for subjects who are overweight or obese or whether IER may confer health benefits to people of any weight independent of weight loss. High-quality research comparing long-term outcomes of IER and CER [continuous energy restriction] are required to ascertain any true benefits or detrimental effects which IER may have for controlling weight and improving metabolic health in the population.”

So, if your clients ask for your opinion on the merits of IF or if they should try it, your best bet is to let them know that there just isn’t enough quality research yet to make a determination. You can, however, remind them of the basic tenets of a healthy diet, such as consuming a variety of whole, fresh foods, practicing portion control and reducing saturated fats and processed foods. In doing so, you can stay well within your scope of practice while also providing quality information that can help guide their food choices and improve their overall health and well-being over the long-term—not just the duration of a short-term diet.

Core strengthening during Pregnancy

6 Jul

is the most natural thing in the world, so it’s no surprise that the core muscles are well equipped to deal with the demands of an increasing baby bump.  The main function of our abdominal  muscles is to provide support for the lumbar spine and stabilise the joints of the pelvis.  The deep abdominal muscles combine with the diaphragm and the pelvis floor to enclose the contents of our abdomen (the baby during pregnancy) creating a cylinder around the mid section.

    A growing baby belly means the front muscles of the abdomen stretch and the pelvis begins to tip forward, altering the ability to stabilise the region.  During pregnancy the body is flooded with the hormone relaxin, which means the muscles become more compliant to lengthening and stretching.  Thus the abdominal cylinder can easily stretch in all directions.   While the abs can stretch significantly, they typically do not tear.  However, they can separate.  Many women suffer this separation towards the end of their pregnancy.   This separation is called Diastasis Recti.  It does not cause a painful separation but it does  compromise the structural integrity of the core.

     The muscles of the core face their biggest challenge at the end of nine months, at the time when the baby exits out of the bottom of the abdominal cylinder through the pelvic floor.  The core stability is further compromised.  In case of a caesarean section, the weakened stability comes from the disruption of the abdominal wall through the surgical incision.

   What can we do to prepare the core during pregnancy ?

While pregnancy is not the time to introduce strenuous new training programs,  exercises to strengthen the core can be very advantageous.  If you train your abs during pregnancy it can lessen the degree of abdominal wall separation.  Core muscles include all of the muscles in the midsection.: the abdominals are a part of your core, as are your hips,  your erectors (lower back) and even some interconnected muscles of the upper back.   

During pregnancy, most women experience significant weakening of certain muscles, often due to stretching and hormonal changes that occur to prepare the body for the birthing process.  The most commonly weakened/ stretched  muscles are the i) Hamstrings (back of the thighs)

  1. ii) Gluteals (buttocks)

                           iii) Back and shoulders

  1. iv) And of course the abdomen

Thus the entire core gets weaker and not just the abdominals.  When pregnant, focus on strengthening the pelvic floor and transverse abdominals both of which comprise the deeper core.  Strengthening the lower abdominal muscles by adopting the pelvic tilt is beneficial.  The improvement of the  gluteus muscle tone is  important as it supports the sacroiliac joint which can be put to test once the baby arrives.  Body weight squats is a great exercise for this.

    Why is core strength so important?

* it will help improve the posture

* it reduces lower back pain and achy pelvis

*  it can lead to fewer complications during delivery

*  can also provide stamina for a faster delivery

* increases the likelihood of a quick recovery post partum

In addition to all of these benefits,  having supportive core muscles and a general high level of fitness  has been shown to improve the health of the baby.  What other reason do we need to invest some time in building up a strong core.

CYCLING AND BONE STRENGTH:

12 Mar

CYCLING & BONE STRENGTH:

Competitive cyclists are potentially at risk of suboptimal bone health. Although cycling is excellent for cardiovascular fitness, this type of non skeletal loading exercise does not mechanically stimulate osteogenesis (bone formation). This situation of low mechanical osteogenic stimulus to build bone can be compounded by restrictive eating patterns and associated hormone dysfunction of relative energy deficiency in sports (RED-S)

The pic shows how different sports exert site specific effects on the bone mineral density of the skeleton. In general terms, hip femoral neck BMD is more dependent on mechanical loading osteogenic stimuli, whereas lumbar spine BMD is more dependent on nutritional and Endocrine status.
What are the most effective mechanical osteogenic stimuli? Evidence from animal models demonstrates that bone responds to exercise that is dynamic, non-repetitive and unpredictable.

Load and repetitions are not such important factors. This is shown in a study of track and field athletes, where sprinters were found to have higher BMD at load bearing sites of the skeleton than long distance runners due to a local loading effect rather than a systemic effect associated with repetitive loading nature of longer distance running.

The other important consideration is that sprinters and rugby players tend to weigh more with higher lean mass than distance runners, providing higher skeletal loading forces.

These differences in anthropometric and body composition metrics are also associated with different nutritional and Endocrine status.

Swimming and cycling are similar in that both these types of exercise do not provide mechanical skeletal loading osteogenic stimulus.

Skeletal loading exercises for cyclists would have to be effective and practical, not requiring access to gym and possible to fit into training schedule throughout the season.


YOGA FOR LOW BACK PAIN

26 Feb

Chronic lower back pain is a leading cause of disability and a major health problem in industrialised countries. Prolonged poor posture and a sedentary lifestyle often cause chronic pain. Poor posture can lead to muscle imbalances around the flexor, extensor and rotator muscles of the back and neck. These muscle imbalances create unequal forces around and weaken the joints, thus making them more vulnerable to stress and pain.

Yoga is now emerging as a recognised means for effectively treating chronic back pain. Studies have shown a reduction in pain and functional disability in subjects with chronic lower back pain who undergo a yoga intervention. One of the first steps in practising yoga is to correct postural alignment, which should help in alleviating pain. Yoga can selectively stretch shortened, tight muscles and strengthen weak, elongated muscles.

Whether sitting or standing, the spine has natural curves that should be maintained for correct postural alignment. These curves can become habitually flattened or overly curved, leading to abnormal posture that can put excessive strain on vertebrae, discs, joints, muscles or ligaments. Abnormal flattening or curving of the spine may be the result of prolonged poor posture while sitting or standing, such as slumping, or the result of a sudden traumatic stress, such as a road traffic accident. In the long term, abnormal posture can lead to the adaptive shortening or elongation of muscles. Several abnormal curvatures of the spine have been documented, but the three most common are: (1) a hunched upper back – that is, excessive kyphosis – usually associated with a forward head posture; (2) an extreme sway in the lower back, called excessive lordosis; and, (3) a flat back posture.

The physical postures of yoga are a form of therapeutic exercise that integrate balance, co-ordination, strength and flexibility. Yoga is emerging as a promising means of alleviating lower back pain and may be of great benefit to patients, particularly when performed in conjunction with other established treatments, such as lifestyle advice, exercise, massage and mobilisations and manipulations. Yoga, when practised in a safe and strategic manner, can be a very useful tool in healing chronic back pain.

Some of the Popular Yoga Postures For Back Mobility and Strength:

Pavanamukthasana, Sethubandasana, Marjariasana, Bhujangasana, Jathara Parivarthasana..etc..,

The Running Menace!!

19 Feb

The Running Menace!!

There is a funny adage which says, Diabetes runs in the family, because no one runs in his family!! While jogging and running is a common form of exercise to keep healthy & fit, overdoing it can result in musculoskeletal s as well. The following is for a novice recreational runner and for health/fitness enthusiasts.

Start Line:

When you begin to Jog / Run, first make sure you have the following 1. Good pair of shoes, preferably with anti-pronation and good cushion 2. The terrain you are going to run, like treadmill, outdoor track, on road etc. Prefer the first two if you have an option 3. Hydrate yourself well and have a well-rested night., the last thing you will need is cramps. 4. Warm up with a low intensity cardio, stretches / foam roller.

Second, make sure you do a Basic Health / Fitness screening, get your risk factors screened for cardio vascular disease and get your Blood pressure and Body fat % Checked. Get a physician approval before you start as it might be high intense for your Heart and Body.

Get a Musculoskeletal Assessment done to check if you are prone for any bone, joint and soft tissue injury like the muscle and tendon. Flat foot, Tight Hamstrings and calf can cause ankle, knee or back injuries. If you have any mobility or strength issues or pre-existing injury, fix them before you start.

On the Track:

People who are already into running, need to ensure they don’t overdo it in FIT Terms!!

Frequency (How Often should I run) – always have a recovery day in between, 5 days a week of moderate intense activity is good., higher the intensity lesser the frequency (3 days), A low intensity Jog or a brisk walk is something which can done all days.

Intensity (How hard should I Train) – High intensity Training can be measured by two ways Heart Rate (HR) & Rate of perceived exertion (RPE). HR maximum (HR max) is calculated by a simple formula 220-age, if you are a 20-year-old adult then your HR max will be 220-20 = 200. A high intensity training will be at 90% and above of HR max. On a RPE scale 0 to 10 where Is 0 no effort at all and 10 is feeling of extremely hard, a high intense training will be 8 and above. Similarly, moderate intense will be 70% to 90% of HR max and 5 to 8 on the RPE scale.

Time (How long should I train) – Higher the intensity lesser the duration and frequency. A high intensity workout will be for 20 to 30mins, 2-3 times a week. Moderate intensity will be from 60 to 70mins, 3-5 times a week.

Finish line:

Remember to cool down after the run with a low intensity cardio and stretch. You may experience muscle soreness for two to three days when you are a beginner (Delayed onset muscle soreness). If it exceeds more than that you need to see a sports physio or a physician. If you are a weekend warrior (exercise only on weekends) do not do high intensity workout, and have an extended warm up and cool down. It’s also important to cross train as it can help to prevent injuries for Ex: 3days of running and 2days of swimming can help to use different muscles on different days and to reduce the impact stress on the joints, so you can run for your life time.

HAPPY RUNNING!!!

Exercise and endothelial function in Chronic Heart Failure

10 May

Chronic heart failure (CHF) is a disease most prevalent in the elderly. Additionally, symptoms are often aggravated in this population because of an overlap between the physiological age-related decline in exercise capacity and the disease-related functional decline. This study aimed to asses the effects of exercise training on endothelial progenator cells (EPCs) number and function in young and older CHF patients. It was found that 4 weeks of aerobic exercise training are effective in increasing EPCs number and function in young and older CHF patients.

60 with stable CHF and 60 healthy controls were divided into 2 age strata of 65 years old. Subjects were randomized until half of each strata (young healthy, young patients, older healthy, older patients) was in the intervention group, receiving 4 weeks of daily exercise training and the other half was in the control group, receiving usual care. EPCs number and function was measured at baseline and after 4 weeks.

This study found an age-related decline in EPCs number and function in healthy subjects, but not in CHF patients. After the short high-dose aerobic exercise training, a significant increase in function and number of EPCs was found in young and older CHF patients, and in older healthy subjects.

The beneficial effects of exercise training on endothelial function and EPCs were not diminished in older patients with CHF, emphasizing the potentials o

f exercise interventions in a patient group where CHF has a high prevalence.

Pendulum by night – Frozen Shoulder

12 Jan

Pendulum by night:

Many a time patients with frozen shoulder, complain of pain in the night. we as therapists, run out of ideas after a while when nothing works!!

The challenging part with adhesive capsulitis stage 1 and 2 (the inflammation & freezing stages ) the patients feels so uncomfortable in the night.,whatever the position they adopt is uncomfortable. They resort to painkillers, hot packs and end up sleeping in sitting the whole night.

I have advised them not to sleep on the affected shoulder and to lie flat.,but to no avail. So what helps??

If anyone says i can get frozen shoulder alright in two sittings please don’t believe it. I tell all my patients it will take time.,i give them atleast 3-4 months..I will discuss this in detail in another post.

Even when you sleep on the painfree shoulder, the weight of the top hand itself will increase the tension in the shoulder. I have found relief in my patients by asking them to support it on a pillow while sleeping on tummy up and on their pain free sides. kind of a distraction effect.

Recently i understood.,that the pain in the night could be because of the migration of the humeral head towards the acromion and reducing the subacromial space and causing compression of the inflammed tissues and thereby pain.

in the day , the gravity does a wonderful job of distracting the shoulder.,so i have started recommending pendulam exercise in the night.,roll on to the tummy leave your hand out of the cot, pick up the waterbottle next to you and swing 30 reps * 2 sets and trust me it helps. ( just make sure the bed is high enough to swing without hurting your hand, if not get next to the bed, take support, bend your knees slightly and swing)

It gives a traction effect and thereby relieves pain and the patients appreciate this simple tip. Managing pain is very important to get patient satisfaction and we have to do so using our physiotherapy skills , technique and most importantly common sense in most cases!!!

How to Alkalize your Body?

7 Sep

How to Alkalize your Body

Studies have shown that if this acidic overload happens over a longer period of time, it can lead to various health conditions, including kidney stones, muscle degradation, reduced bone density, and even arthritis, diabetes, and cancer. All of these can be traced back in some way to an acidic inner terrain.

Alkaline vs. Acidic

A 2014 study, published in the European journal Diabetologia, involved tracking more than 66,000 women over the course of 14 years. Compared to women who ate an alkaline diet, participants who consumed high-acid diets showed a significant increase in developing type 2 diabetes over the course of the study, according to the results. An acid-forming diet with low vegetable intake is also linked to an increased risk of metabolic syndrome.

This is very damaging and impairs the body’s ability to repair or detoxify and will cause a person to be more susceptible to disease and illness. The most common signs of acidosis are:

Fatigue or chronic fatigue
Feeling tired, low energy
Brittle nails and hair
Low bone density, osteoporosis
Heavy breathing
Gaining weight or being underweight
Digestive issues
Arthritis, diabetes
Headaches, acne
Bad immune system
Infections, allergies, candida
Heart problems, cancer

But it’s not just the food we eat that can cause an acidic environment. Our body creates acid by using muscles, breathing, and digesting certain foods. Other factors can be stress, toxins, a polluted environment, tobacco, lack of sleep, or medications.

If you want to know whether you’re more on the alkaline or acidic side, you can easily test that at home. Simply get some test stripes at your health food store or online which you can use for either your saliva or urine to show you the results.

Literally billions of cells in your tissues rely on an alkaline environment to function properly, prevent cellular damage and fend off pathogenic microbes. So what happens when you eat an alkaline diet?

Benefits of an alkaline diet

Deeper more restful sleep
Reduction of candida overgrowth
Increased mental acuity or alertness
Enhanced memory and cognition
Easier weight loss
Increased energy
Better bone health
Reduced muscle wasting
Proper cell functioning
Healthy tissues
Mitigation of chronic diseases
Improved cardiovascular health

This doesn’t mean that all we should eat are alkalizing foods. It’s very commonly advised to opt for a balance of 80% alkaline-forming food and 20% acidic-forming food. You can take a look below and choose from the lists – just remember to keep acid-forming foods to a minimum.

Alkalizing foods to eat abundantly

All Vegetables, especially when Green and Raw

All Fruits like Melon, Apple, Berries, Grapes, Lemon. Some are slightly acidic, like Blueberries, Cranberries, and Plums.

Leafy Greens like Spinach or Lettuce, Cruciferous Vegetables like Broccoli, Kale
Pumpkin, Potatoes, Sweet Potatoes, Beets
Mushrooms, Sprouts, Legumes

Nuts & Seeds like Coconut, Almonds, Chia, Sesame

Onions, Garlic, Leek and Herbs/Spices like Parsley, Ginger

Wheat and Barley Grass, Algae like Spirulina and Chlorella

Grains like Amaranth, Millet & Quinoa
Fresh Beans, Green Peas, Lima Beans, Soy

Acidic foods to cut out

Meat, fish, shellfish

Milk, eggs, butter, cheese

Coffee, soda, alcohol

Processed and refined food
Sugar, artificial sweeteners, refined grains
Tobacco, preservatives
MSG, canned food

How to start eating alkaline today

In order to make this approach to eating a balanced diet more actionable and easier for you, we’ve come up with some general guidelines that are helpful if you want to eat a more alkaline diet:

1. Drink a lot of water to flush your system and support natural detoxification. Extra points if you add lemon to it – remember that acid tasting food doesn’t automatically mean it’s also acid forming! After waking up, drink a huge glass of water. For more alkaline effects, add some apple cider vinegar to it.

2. Combine alkaline foods in a meal with foods that are acidic to create a good balance and focus on foods that are high in potassium like lemons or bananas.

3. Choose fresh, organic, GMO-free food whenever possible. Also, look out for minerals to help your body neutralize acid wastes (organic foods have a higher nutritional content).

4. Stay as close to the natural state of a food as possible, meaning eat it raw or steamed as opposed to frying it.

5. Make salads a staple in your meal plan. Leafy greens are the most alkaline foods and also rich in vital micronutrients. Use spinach or kale for best results, the darker the better.

6. Foods like whole grains or some legumes are not alkaline forming, but also offer nutritional benefits and are a part of a healthy diet – so you should eat them along with your alkaline foods. These are grains like oats, millet, spelt, or buckwheat as well as beans and lentils.

7. Replace animal foods with vegetable sources of protein, such as tofu, beans, or broccoli. These are a lot more alkaline-forming.

8. Incorporate more fruits and veggies into your diet by snacking on them, making fresh smoothies or green juices.

9. Try to eat some carrots, cauliflower, broccoli, eggplant, cucumber, potatoes, or celery every day. Soak and sprout your nuts and grains for more alkalinity.

Other ways to alkalize your body

Eat slowly and chew every bite around 30-40 times. Be careful not to overeat and overload your system.

Make meditation a habit & do some deep breathing exercises to reduce stress.

Throw away your chemical-filled shampoos, cleaning products, or air fresheners. Try to find and use natural products instead with only minimal ingredients.

Go for a walk or work out, since it helps to move acidic waste products in order for your body to better eliminate them. Extra points for getting some sunshine.

Baking soda can also help neutralize the acid and help the body to maintain pH balance in the urine and bloodstream. It is also very useful for relieving heartburn or acid indigestion.

The Six pack secret!!!

29 Aug

Many a times, i have been countered with this question.,How do i get a six pack?? Yes its a sign of a healthy , super fit body.,with our without musculoskeletal injuries, a price you sometimes pay for pushing the limits.

Once one of my celebrity client said.,the 6 pack fad is so rampant that all the film stars want one.,even a cart puller or a farmer in the village or fisherman has one!! The truth is it looks great on some and not so great on few.,the reason you lose fat all over the body and not selectively over abdomen ( There is no spot reduction ). Every man and sometimes women (wash board abs) want it., why my 7 year old nephew was trying to show me one recently.

How do we achieve it?? For me its your lifestyle.,i have seen young tennis / cricket players have six pack without hitting the gym or doing any form of specific drills..its their lifestyle (sport) that gives them.

Well then what about you and me?? Yes of course its possible.,its all about how badly??

In my experience you need to have 3-5% body fat only to have a 6 pack for men. If you are someone looking at a six pack thats what you need to aim at. Give yourself time and work towards it.

Exercise:

You need to burn fat.,moderate intense cardiovascular exercise.,( cycling/swimming/jogging/walking) interspersed with high intensity bouts (cross fit / functional training / boot camp) amounting to not less than 700 calories a day.

Add to that your core training and good strength training (as you may lose your muscle in the process if you don’t train them). The predominant focus should be on cardio vascular activity.

Nutrition / Diet :

Diet plays a major role.,its not about how much you eat.,its about what you eat. what does a farmer get to eat / drink?? The ragi / rice kanji, the buttermilk, milk, vegetables, fish, eggs may be. Cutting of oil, sugar, anything that tastes sweet, be it even fruits.,and switching to millets/cereals, low calorie, low fat, low sugar natural foods is the key,

Plenty of fluids and spaced out mini meals, i recently learnt about eating every hours and handful amount of right kind of food and thats what your body needs. The bottom line you don’t need to starve.

Do not stock high calorie stuffs at home.,or your temptation foods.,that are high in sugar and fat. Do not eat when stressed or when you have nothing to do.,if you have to, snack on fresh vegetables and fruits.

Do not resort to supplements, fat burners or steroids.,may give you short term, quick results in a short time.,but are potentially harmful, most of them, if not all.

Life style:

Its not those two hours you spend in the gym.,its about the rest of 22 hours that matter..if you are a software guy, sitting in front of the computer for 10 hours a day.,its gonna be difficult. if you are a sportsmen, trainer, physio you have a much better opportunity to get one and maintain it.

Stay active is the key!!

Genetics:

If you are blessed with a good gene, with a good resting / basal metabolic rate you are lucky.

Now go get it guys, its simple.,all it takes is only a lot of determination!!

What are we missing!!!

25 Feb

The other day, when i was in Manipal, i was little reluctant to use the shower in the guest house and i used the bucket with mug, to bathe. To my surprise, i ended up doing 25 squats at least in the process!!There used to be days, where we used to sit on the floor cross legged and do the Indian squats.,which till recently our allopathy medicine discourages to do it..We need a foreigner to research and to tell us the Indian squat position is great for bowel movement .

Then we have this thoppukaranam., our teachers used to make us do as punishment if we come late to school..again we need a outsider to tell is its brain yoga.We used to run and play barefoot, when we were kids.,now the newly born baby has socks and mitts!! Thanks to western influence. Now the whole world says, walk / run barefoot!!

Well water pulley and rope, Carrying pots on the head and waist, pounding rice (ulakkai), the ammi kal (Hand Grinder stone), Chakki and kulavi & aatukal (stone grinder ), mortar and pestle have been traditionally great functional work., solagu or muram and pan grinder are great relaxing exercises, Now they are all near oblivion since everyone has moved towards electrical grinders. Incidentally my physio saranya, accounted how all these were greatly useful during the power cut in the flooding days in Chennai. I also see all of them taking place in fitness in the form of functional exercise in recent times.,which were part of our day today life till about 20 years back!!

Cycling / walking to school great cardio exercise.,we used to do doubles and triples on the cycle.,playing on the streets in the hot sun (talk about vitamin D). My 8 year old nephew was recently jumping on the stair case from 4-5 steps.,didn’t feel like stopping him.,as i recently read jumping and plyometrics are great for fascial fitness!!

Growing up, we were less protected.,allowed to fall and rise, get hurt.,today i feel children are too protected within the confines of the wall. The whole world is realizing what we as india has offered to the world.,yoga, varma, ayurveda…its time we realized what we have in store!!

Growing up, we were less protected.,allowed to fall and rise, get hurt.,today i feel children are too protected within the confines of the wall. The whole world is realizing what we as india has offered to the world.,yoga, varma, ayurveda…its time we realized what we have in store!!